Most Lethal Species In The World

Top Five

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Remmy Boyce, Artist, Writer

The most lethal species in the world

Top 5

 

  1. Dogs

Man’s best friend also happens to be one of man’s best killers. Dog attacks that are fatal are very uncommon, adding up to about 12 deaths a year. Like many of the species on the list, dogs are one of the top killers because of the diseases they carry, rather than showing aggression towards people. According to www.cdc.gov,  98 percent of all deaths by rabies are from encounters with dogs, Killing over 59,000 people a year worldwide. That means that a person dies of rabies about every nine minutes. However, this is not an issue in places that vaccinate their animals like the United States, United Kingdom, and other medically advanced countries. 20,000 of those deaths are from India due to their issues with stray dogs.

 

  1. Snakes

Fear of snakes, or Ophidiophobia, is reportedly the most common fear. About a third of the world’s population admits they have Ophidiophobia, and maybe for good reason. According to www.telegraph.co.uk, around 5.4 million people will be bitten by a snake per year. Out of that number, it is possible that over 90,000 people die from snake bites each year worldwide. India, again, suffers the most deaths at 11,000 deaths per year. Most deaths by snakes come from Southern Asia as that is where some of the most venomous snakes in the world live. A single bite from a King Cobra, a snake that is found in India, Southern China, and Southeast Asia, can kill you in around 30 minutes. One of the deadliest snakes, that kills more than any other snake combined, is the Saw Scaled viper. The Saw Scaled is very aggressive and very hard to spot. With venom that destroys the tissue, the only anti venom they have is said to “save lives, not limbs.”

 

  1. Freshwater snails

Freshwater snails are tranquil creatures that grow to be around 1-4 inches. They are very popular in aquariums as they help keep the cleanliness of the tank and add good bacteria to the water. Freshwater snails carry a disease called schistosomiasis, and though they are small, they kill around 200,000 people per year, according to www.pri.org. This puts them in third place for our top five most lethal animals. That’s more deaths than sharks, crocodiles, wolves, and lions combined. You can contract the disease by entering water in any way. The parasites detaches from the snail and will literally go after you. Yeah.

 

  1. Humans

You might be surprised that we are not at the number one spot, with our yearly homicide rates at 437,000 people murdered per year, according to ourworldindata.org. Around 70 percent of all homicides are from firearms, followed by knives, and suffocation. African Americans are found to be killed more than any other ethinic group. Men are three times more likely to be the perpetrator and over a third of women murdered were by current or former partners. The most common reasons for murder seen in the U.S. are lust/jealousy, revenge, personal gain, and thrill. The countries with the highest rate of homicide are Honduras, Venezuela, and El Salvedore. Meanwhile, Japan, Singapore, and Switzerland are on the opposite end, having the lowest amount of homicides and crime rates per year in the world.

 

  1. Mosquitoes

Our number one spot also happens to be the smallest of our competitors, growing to be an average of 3mm. There are 3,500 different types of mosquitoes and a single female can lay over 300 eggs at a time. Mosquitoes, and the diseases they carry, kill over one million people worldwide, per year. Killing more than any of the species on this list combined. According to www.hardydiagnostics.com, mosquitoes have been known to carry 19 different diseases. The most dangerous among them include yellow fever, leishmaniasis, sanbis Virus, and malaria. In 2015 alone about half the deaths caused by mosquitoes was from malaria. 90 percent of Malaria cases occur in africa but that isn’t to say that the U.S. isn’t affected. Although extremely rare, Mosquito-borne diseases do occur in the United States, but only 6 people have died so far this year, says www.nytimes.com. Compared to the people dying around the world, this barely scratches the surface.